Reversing Camera in a Car

What is a Reversing Camera?

Reversing Camera, in car back-up cameras or commonly known as Rear-view cameras are video cameras that mount on the rear of your vehicle and enable you to reverse more safely. They are built into many new vehicles, but older or less expensive cars might not have them.

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Installation:

Because the actual picture signal on a rear-view mirror camera or in car back-up cameras is transmitted wirelessly, you won’t need to run a video cable under your car. However, you will need to provide a power source for the camera and transmitter at the rear of your car.

Here’s how to install a typical wireless rear-view camera. Before you follow any of these steps, you should consult the manual of the device you purchase. Also turn your vehicle off, disconnect the battery and consult the owner’s manual to make sure you won’t drill into any wires.

  • The camera mounts on the outside of your vehicle. It’s typically held in place by the screws at the top of your license plate. You’ll need to use a drill to bore a small hole behind your license plate into the trunk. Then you run the included video cable from the camera to the transmitter, which stays in your trunk.
  • To power the transmitter, you’ll need to tap into your car’s reverse light power cable by stripping that cable and attaching it to the power cable of the transmitter using electrician’s tape. This way, the monitor and camera will power on when you put your vehicle in reverse.
  • This installation process takes around an hour. It’s worth noting that a few rear-view cameras require even less installation. If you are unsure of the safety of your installation, consult with a professional mechanic. Wired installations are very similar, but rather than connecting your camera to a transmitter, you’ll have to run a cable the entire length of your vehicle and physically connect it to your monitor.

Field of View – Bigger is better:

You should look for a camera with a field of view of about 100 degrees or more, to ensure you’re getting complete coverage of your back bumper. If you drive a large truck or SUV, you might want even more coverage.

Night Vision – A must have:

You do much of your driving when it is dark outside. The best backup cameras have infrared LEDs that illuminate behind your car so you’ll see a black-and-white picture on the monitor. Most of the cameras we reviewed have night vision, even some of the more affordable ones around $70.

Wireless signal strength & quality:

Interference can be an issue for some wireless in car back-up cameras. They broadcast on the 2.4GHz frequency, which is also used by a variety of common electronics such as Bluetooth devices and Wi-Fi networks. When there is interference in your signal, it leads to degradation of the quality of your picture, even to the point where it can be unusable at times.